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10-Winter Household Gaffes to Avoid

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St. Louis City Heating Contractor Prescribes Safety Tips

 

Hoffmann Brothers, a heater contractor, provides residents of St. Louis City with the most common gaffes to avoid.

 

The sealed flue.

Before burning the fireplace or hearth, make sure the flue is open to prevent any fatal situations (i.e. fire, carbon monoxide poisoning).

 

A garaged, idling vehicle.

When a car idles, while it is parked in the garage, carbon monoxide seeps into the home.

 

Forgoing an emergency kit.

In the event of a weather related disaster, does your home have an emergency kit, (solar charger, adequate food, water, flashlights etc.)? Be sure to refer to the emergency information at Ready.gov to create an emergency kit.

 

Unadjusted gas water storage heater.

Another potentially hazardous or combustive situation is an improperly adjusted gas water heater or any other appliance that uses gas. The outcome can be fatal. (The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are below)

 

Mistaken stomach flu.

The symptoms of the stomach flu influenza mimic those of carbon monoxide poisoning. Watery eyes, nose and throat irritation, coughing, headaches, dizziness, fatigue, nausea are the preliminary symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning and coughing.

 

Purchasing non-certified gas appliances.

When comparing heating systems and other gas fueled appliances, shop for ones with a national testing agencies and laboratories (in example: the CSA Group). (Certified appliance have to pass specific safety standards).

 

Using the stove to heat the home.

Never ever use the oven or the stove top’s burner to heat the home. Even if you’re trying to save on the heating bill or heat the home while the system is being replaced, it is an unsafe.

 

“Carbon monoxide is an odorless, invisible and fatal gas,” warns a representative of the St. Louis City heater contractor company.

 

Improper generator usage.

Improper usage of gasoline powered generators contributes to a high incident rate of house fires and carbon monoxide poisoning (CO). As a rule of thumb, any fossil fuel powered generator should always live outside. These alternative power systems generate high levels of CO poisoning. A crawlspace, basement, garage and other enclosed areas are inappropriate places for a generator.

 

No heat piping patchwork.

Never ever patch a vent pipe or piping, where gas or other fossil fuels are burning. Gas could seep out causing CO poisoning.

 

Instead call a locally, licensed heating contractor. For instance, in St. Louis City, Hoffmann Brothers are the trusted and preferred specialists for heating and air conditioning systems.

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