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Heat Pumps vs. Conventional Heating Systems

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The question for many St. Louis homeowners is whether it is worthwhile to upgrade from a conventional heating system to a heat pump. If you prefer to curtail monthly energy costs, heat pumps afford a significant savings. Yet, there are several underlying differences between a heat pump and a conventional heating system.

 

Heat pumps generate hot and cool air, cleaning, circulation, and dehumidification. In comparison, heating systems produce warm air only. An air conditioner executes the same as a heat pump with the exception of heating.

 

Heat pumps do not consume the volume of energy that standard heating systems do. Because the technology of heat pumps transfers heat versus producing it, these heating systems are far more affordable to operate.

 

In the summer, a heat pump eliminates moisture, providing cool and dry comfort. Heating systems do not cool indoor temperatures in the summer. Controlling moisture with a standard AC is not as effective or efficient as a heat pump.

 

The ENERGYSTAR program sets minimum benchmarks on both conventional heating systems and heat pumps (i.e. SEER, HSPF, AFUE).

 

Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) refers to the total cooling of a heat pump or central cooling system versus the total electricity consumed to produce the cool air.

 

Most conventional systems rely on electricity, gas or other fossil fuels to operate.

 

Heating Seasonal Performance Factor HSPF represents another measure of a heat pump’s energy efficiency, specifically over a heating season. The measurement refers to the heat output of a heat pump system in comparison to the actual electricity it consumes,

 

According to EnergyStar.gov, the minimum energy requirements for an air source heat pump is 14.5 SEER with a minimum of 8.2 HSPF.

 

Both heat pumps and conventional heating systems have to comply with the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute Standard 210/240 for 2003 Unitary Air Conditioning and Air Source Heat Pump Equipment specifications.

 

Let the professionals at Hoffmann Brothers size your St. Louis home with a new heat pump or a conventional heating system. Call Hoffmann Brothers at 314.664.3011.

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