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Recipe for Indoor Air Quality in St. Louis

Posted by on in HVAC Tips & Advice
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Assuring fresh, clean indoor air quality goes well beyond changing the filter on the heating and air conditioner every 30-days. Several household air appliances and do-it-yourself fixes represent a recipe for good indoor air quality. Hoffmann Brothers, a St. Louis heating and air conditioning contractor prescribes three fixes to enhance a healthy indoor environment. Read how clean air purifiers, plants and other natural elements help accommodate good indoor air quality.

Purify the air.

Carbon monoxide released from cigarette smoke poses a detriment to indoor air quality.

The particulates emitted from second hand smoke are comprised carcinogens which linger in the air long after the cigarette has been extinguished.

Fix: Restrict guests from smoking indoors. Establish a designated smoking area away from the home’s windows and doorways.

Infuse with a natural freshener.

Air fresheners tend to be rich in volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which often attribute to the short term events of asthma attacks, dizziness, and other respiratory allergic reactions. The release of carcinogenic compounds is traceable to air fresheners and other household cleaning products), associated with the long term effects of kidney and liver problems.

Fix: Replace household cleaning products loaded with chemicals for natural alternatives, such as baking soda, white vinegar and essential oils.

Promote indoor air quality.

Sometimes, outdoor temperatures and climates prevent households from opening the window for a fresh supply of air. Particularly in colder and muggy climates, air purification systems and plants promote indoor air quality.

Fix: Plants introduce oxygen. Clean air purifiers terminate airborne contaminants, reducing the spread of bacteria and particle matter. Some homes in St. Louis use UV Germicidal lights to target and obstruct the spread of unwanted pollutants.

Learn more about indoor air quality and explore additional ideas in St. Louis.

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